No One Is Coming to Save You - And That's A Very Good Thing

by Bez Maxwell  Nov 9, 2015
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"No one is coming to save you, but it is not because you are unloved. To the contrary: You are so revered, so adored, so magnificent, that to send to you a savior would be to destroy your opportunity to become what you are in truth, to realize yourself fully, in the glory of your divine humanity.

It is true, there are those who need surrogate representatives to protect their interests: the children, the elderly, the sick, the caged, the oppressed, and the mad, and there are not enough heroines to care for them all.

No one is coming to save you because you are the hero, the heroine who has come to free up life here. Yours must come first. There is no other way.

If you were not required to save yourself, you would not know what it takes, your compassion would be shallow, your eyes would be dull and cloudy, your strength would not hold out.

If you refuse to save yourself, you condemn creation to incompletion. Those you might have healed, might have protected, might have represented, might have loved back into wholeness, may not fulfill their own destinies either. For some of these unknown persons, you may have been the last dry match in the world, and it would be enough to set them ablaze by your example.

You don't need the white knight. You are the wild horse racing the wind. You don't need the holy man. You are already holy. You don't need the medicine. You are the medicine. You don't need magic. You are a living miracle. You don't need acceptance. You are loved and adored beyond measure. You don't need courage. You need faith.

There is nothing wrong with you. Be who you are: who you really are underneath all the lies inside you.

You are the return of the promise. The peacekeeper. The grace giver. The redemptive force of Creation here to uplift the broken-hearted.

No one is more qualified than you are to do your holy work.

Apply all that secret knowledge. Set it in motion. Give it form in the world, and become the living gift that never empties."

- Alison Nappi

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No one is coming to save you.

I remember when I first began my practice of Orgasmic Meditation, a 15-minute partnered sexual wellness practice where both people practice just paying attention to and feeling sensation. One of the most alarming aspects of it was that no one did anything when I cried.

I have always been a very emotional woman...

Expressive, ranting, crying, volatile. Someone who people often endeavored to “make feel better” so that I wouldn’t be so loud and honest about uncomfortable topics. (Do you know how that one goes?)

I was used to seeing crying as “a problem.”

I knew, inside of myself, that it wasn’t always a problem. In fact, it often felt like a necessary and healthy release. Tears would come and go in a natural wave. But I didn’t know how to tell that to anyone else in a way that made sense. I often felt I needed to manage my tears in order to not make people uncomfortable, so as not to initiate the, “Are you OK?” or “Calm down!” conversation. Can you relate?

Which happens so often. It’s so common that when we’re crying, someone does the well-intentioned thing of trying to comfort us. It’s meant as a show of support, I am certain. But actually, it’s a subtle way of skirting around the wisdom of our bodies and the natural experience of emotion and sensation as living humans. It’s a subtle buy-in to the notion that we need to be saved.

Since when did crying become a problem, anyway, and not something periodic and as natural as smiling? Why don’t we view our tears as a show of strength? That to be overcome with such powerful emotion is just one of the blessings of being alive? Why do we instead attempt to quell such forces in ourselves and others, and feel weak if we can’t stop them from taking us over?

Enter my OM practice.

The first time I cried during an OM, I felt a lifetime of relief wash over me.

Because no one asked me if I was OK.

No one turned to me with a pinched frown or an eyebrow raised in concern and asked, “How can I help you feel better?” No one told me to calm down. There were no sympathetic sighs or words of encouragement. There was just the simple truth that I was having a human experience—a normal, natural experience that would resolve itself and required no intervention. And that since we were connected through the practice, we were having and allowing that experience together.

Because "no one is coming to save you, but it is not because you are unloved. To the contrary: You are so revered, so adored, so magnificent, that to send to you a savior would be to destroy your opportunity to become what you are in truth, to realize yourself fully, in the glory of your divine humanity.”

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Photo Credit: Audrey's Monday Weekly Inspirations on Buzznet